The Cambridgeshire sundial trail

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

This is one of a series of sundial lists designed to help visitors to find good and interesting sundials to see in areas unfamiliar to them. Follow the links for a list of our pages for other places in Britain, or for a complete list of all these pages, divided by country.

This list was originally compiled by the Margaret Stanier, who is the author of Cambridge Sundials which gives colour photographs and descriptions of 19 dials in the City of Cambridge, and 4 others nearby. Some useful additions have been kindly suggested by others.

Cambridge is rich in sundials, some ancient, some very modern. Sundials have been much used in recent years as commemorative gifts, recording an event, a person or an occasion. So although sundials are being lost through neglect or weathering, new ones are appearing. The selection for this review has been made by thought for historic interest, beauty of style or ingenuity of design; and also by consideration of accessibility and visibility by members of the public.

Wisbech is a small market town in the north of the county, at the edge of the fens. Its parish church, the Church of SS Peter & Paul, is built in a curious hotchpotch of architectural styles, having been erected and destroyed, altered and extended, many times over the years. Over the south door of the porch there is a fine dial inscribed on Ketton limestone, dating from 1993. The motto 'Pereunt et Imputantur' is a favourite of classical diallists. It is a tag from Martial, a Roman poet of the first century A.D. '(The days) pass away and are set down to (our) charge'.

This dial was made as a replacement for an older one of marble, contemporary with the pediment and side pillars of the dial face, probably eighteenth century. The marble dial shattered during an attempted repair. At the time of replacement the opportunity was taken of recalculating the hour lines with greater accuracy. (TF 463096)

 

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